Shopping Centers – HTLHB http://htlhb.com/ Tue, 13 Jul 2021 04:31:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://htlhb.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Shopping Centers – HTLHB http://htlhb.com/ 32 32 40,000 EV Charging Stations Planned in Southern California – Daily Bulletin https://htlhb.com/40000-ev-charging-stations-planned-in-southern-california-daily-bulletin/ https://htlhb.com/40000-ev-charging-stations-planned-in-southern-california-daily-bulletin/#respond Tue, 13 Jul 2021 00:58:16 +0000 https://htlhb.com/40000-ev-charging-stations-planned-in-southern-california-daily-bulletin/ Which will come first More electric cars on California’s streets or additional chargers for electric cars? This chicken-and-egg problem has plagued the gasoline-to-electric switch, which is due to be completed by 2035 according to a target set by Governor Gavin Newsom to reduce the harmful smog and greenhouse gases that cause global climate change. Southern […]]]>


Which will come first More electric cars on California’s streets or additional chargers for electric cars?

This chicken-and-egg problem has plagued the gasoline-to-electric switch, which is due to be completed by 2035 according to a target set by Governor Gavin Newsom to reduce the harmful smog and greenhouse gases that cause global climate change.

Southern California Edison announced a plan on Monday, July 12, to exponentially multiply the number of car electric chargers placed in Southern California, increasing from around 3,000 now to over 40,000 over the next four years.

SCE, the Rosemead-based, investor-run utility company serving portions of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, and San Bernardino counties, will spend $ 436 million to incentivize the installation of electrical charging outlets for its public school customers, Town halls, libraries, hospitals, shopping malls and multi-family condominiums, townhouses and apartment complexes.

With the start of the second round of the “Charge Ready” program, commercial and industrial property owners as well as apartment building associations can apply for a wide range of programs to help them install electric car chargers powered by SCE power.

“More charging equipment is needed to give these EV drivers the peace of mind to charge whenever and wherever they want,” said Carter Prescott, SCE director for eMobility and Building Electrification, during the virtual introductory presentation on Monday. “And SCE will continue to lead the way in electrifying transportation and ensuring an effective framework for a clean air future for our communities.”

Several companies took advantage of the smaller round one pilot in 2018, which added 2,700 charging ports in nearly 150 locations and ended in May. For example, the Fairplex in Pomona has partnered with SCE to install 200 electric car chargers on the 487-acre site that hosts the Los Angeles County Fair and 400 other events throughout the year.

The City of Long Beach also participated, adding 102 charging ports in five locations including the Aquarium of the Pacific, The Pike Outlets and the Long Beach Police Academy.

Locations in the San Bernardino and Riverside counties received 257 charging points in 21 locations, including those in the city of Ontario in the Civic Center Complex, Citizens Business Bank Arena and the Ontario Convention Center, SCE officials said.

“We know EVs and charging are part of what California will be in the future and where it is going now,” said Walter Marquez, Interim CEO of Fairplex during a panel discussion with first-time attendees on Monday. Marquez said the future should include electric vehicle charging, especially when LA Metro’s all-electric Gold Line light rail is within 100 meters of the Fairplex property. The line, now known as the L-Line, is currently under construction.

The budget approved by the California Public Utilities Commission is sufficient to add around 38,000 new charging points in the SCE service area in four years.

Obviously, the state has a long way to go to achieve its goal.

At the end of 2020, SCE had around 5,500 charging ports in its service area, if you include the charging of cars and heavy and medium-duty charging stations for buses, trucks and fleet vehicles. SCE officials estimate that around 9,000 or more will be added annually as part of the new program.

The state intends to achieve “CO2 neutrality” by 2045. But to get there, about 26 million cars – almost all of which are on the streets today – have to be electric vehicles, said Pedro Pizarro, President and CEO of Edison International during the webinar. He wants to have 7 million electric cars on California’s roads by 2030, he said.

Traffic accounts for almost two fifths of the state’s CO2 emissions. Achieving zero CO2 emissions would mean a complete switch to electric vehicles. Of the roughly 26 million cars and 6 million trucks on the roads today, about 860,000 electric vehicles are registered in the state, and of those about 280,000 are in the SCE area, Paul Griffo, SCE spokesman, said in an email -Answer.

SCE plans to target installations in disadvantaged communities. It also creates incentives for existing and not yet built apartment buildings by offering discounts and, in some cases, covering installation and infrastructure costs.

Russ Khouri, senior vice president of Orange-based Investment Concepts Inc., had chargers installed in three of the company’s apartment buildings and may add more. “With gasoline usage soaring, it may be time to start a program and give our residents the ability to charge their cars right at home,” he said.



Source link

]]>
https://htlhb.com/40000-ev-charging-stations-planned-in-southern-california-daily-bulletin/feed/ 0
Sheriff’s Department seeks volunteers in Rancho San Diego https://htlhb.com/sheriffs-department-seeks-volunteers-in-rancho-san-diego/ https://htlhb.com/sheriffs-department-seeks-volunteers-in-rancho-san-diego/#respond Sun, 11 Jul 2021 16:38:43 +0000 https://htlhb.com/sheriffs-department-seeks-volunteers-in-rancho-san-diego/ The Rancho San Diego Sheriff’s Station on Campo Road in Spring Valley requires high-level volunteers for patrol duties in Spring Valley, Jamul and Rancho San Diego as well as La Mesa and El Cajon without legal personality. Volunteers act as second eyes and ears in the community, patrolling schools, parks, hiking trails, neighborhoods, and shopping […]]]>


The Rancho San Diego Sheriff’s Station on Campo Road in Spring Valley requires high-level volunteers for patrol duties in Spring Valley, Jamul and Rancho San Diego as well as La Mesa and El Cajon without legal personality.

Volunteers act as second eyes and ears in the community, patrolling schools, parks, hiking trails, neighborhoods, and shopping malls. If they see anything suspicious or inappropriate, call the sheriff’s deputies, said Craig Carlson, the station’s volunteer administrator.

To volunteer, prospects must be 50 years or older, a U.S. citizen or legal resident who has applied for citizenship, have a valid California driver’s license, have auto insurance, have health insurance, and have no criminal conviction.

Potential volunteers must pass a background check, attend a two-week volunteer patrol academy in September, and be physically able to perform the role’s duties.

Carlson said the duties required of volunteers will include traffic control, neighborhood patrols, foot patrols in malls and schools, home inspections of residents who are on vacation, checking the wellbeing of seniors, and assisting crime prevention officers with public presentations.

If necessary, they will also help with civil functions and perform other duties to assist the sheriff’s department.

Once accepted, the volunteers will attend a two-week academy and training patrol. The academy teaches the recruits the tasks, driver training and the use of police radio. According to the academy, the minimum requirement is a six-hour patrol per week and attendance at a monthly meeting.

The next academy will take place in September.

Anyone interested in joining the Rancho San Diego Sheriff’s Senior Volunteer Patrol should contact the Volunteer Line at (619) 660-7021.



Source link

]]>
https://htlhb.com/sheriffs-department-seeks-volunteers-in-rancho-san-diego/feed/ 0
CNU, Mayor hopes to attract new tenants to Stonelake Landing | news https://htlhb.com/cnu-mayor-hopes-to-attract-new-tenants-to-stonelake-landing-news/ https://htlhb.com/cnu-mayor-hopes-to-attract-new-tenants-to-stonelake-landing-news/#respond Sat, 10 Jul 2021 01:22:08 +0000 https://htlhb.com/cnu-mayor-hopes-to-attract-new-tenants-to-stonelake-landing-news/ California Northstate University (CNU) and Elk Grove Mayor Bobby Singh Allen are working to attract new businesses to the long-suffering Stonelake Landing Shopping Center. Stonelake Landing is located on West Taron Court near Elk Grove Boulevard and Interstate 5 and has been owned by the university since 2018. The center is currently staffed by companies […]]]>


California Northstate University (CNU) and Elk Grove Mayor Bobby Singh Allen are working to attract new businesses to the long-suffering Stonelake Landing Shopping Center.

Stonelake Landing is located on West Taron Court near Elk Grove Boulevard and Interstate 5 and has been owned by the university since 2018.

The center is currently staffed by companies such as Oz Korean BBQ, The Vyne and Spirits, and Dreaming Dog Brewery.

CNU officials had previously intended to build a 13-story hospital in an area that encompasses the western portion of the mall, adjacent to the current university campus in Elk Grove.

However, following opposition from neighbors, business owners, and environmentalists, the hospital’s proposal was ultimately rejected by the Elk Grove Planning Commission due to its location within the 200-year flood plain. It was.

Last month, CNU officials announced plans to build a hospital on the site of the Sleep Train Arena in Sacramento’s North Natomas.

The CNU is no longer tracking the construction of a hospital near the campus, but is watching Sacramento’s hospital planning and activation of Stone Lake Landing.

CNU President and CEO Alvin Cheung told citizens last week that a study of Stonelake Landing had never exceeded 50% occupancy since it was built about 12 years ago. Currently 80% free.

“We knew it had to be a place or a purpose that didn’t meet the mall’s requirements,” he said. “So we considered all the other options. We have recognized that by reusing the shopping center, we will benefit from this property and our neighbors will also benefit. “

Chan said he would love to attract tenants who offer businesses that offer a variety of amenities that will attract neighbors to Stone Lake.

“We’re working on it (plan),” he said. “Our goal is to lease it and exceed 50% of the points.”

Fine dining is one of the businesses CNU is looking to bring to Stone Lake Landing, Cheung said.

“We’re actually looking for business owners who want to establish themselves in fine dining, fine dining,” he said. “(Such facilities) create a good living atmosphere. Other convenience stores can help. We have that in mind and are bringing more comfort to the neighborhood. Is the goal. “

Stonelake Landing has approximately 25 commercial spaces and Cheung expects to rent those spaces to approximately 18 companies.

“That means multiple (room) business owners will have a few units,” he said. “That means from 2,500 (square feet) to 3,000 (square feet) these are the right size.”

Cheung spoke about the future of the current tenant at Stonelake Landing.

“For those who are good and confident, I think it will continue to work,” he said. “You stay or come back.

“An example was a well-run Japanese restaurant, but now it’s back. Another restaurant owner is back and says, “Well, maybe we can expand the variety and choice of this neighborhood. I do not want. “He’s thinking about leasing two units. “

Chan added that he would like to have a pizzeria in the mall.

“We call that ‘Game Day Food,’” he said. “You have to have it, as far as I can tell, pizza is the way to go.”

Singh-Allen told residents that their involvement in efforts to attract more renters to Stonelake Landing began last month.

“Many stakeholders contacted (and asked) after learning that the CNU was developing a hospital project in Natomas, the former sleeper train (arena) where Kings once played. For landing? “

“So I got Dr. Cheung and CNU contacted because I wanted to be on the front lines and start this dialogue. For this mall to be successful. It is very important. I actually live in Stone Lake so I have a personal interest in seeing the neighborhood come alive. “

Singh-Allen said it is important to have a variety of SMEs in malls and maximize their potential.

“That hasn’t happened to this day,” she says. “It’s a great place, but it was a challenge from the start.”

She said she believes the mall needs a strong anchor business and needs help from Stone Lake residents and neighbors.

Singh-Allen emphasized her belief that it is important to focus on this mall and keep it moving.

“As Mayor of Elk Grove, I want our small business community and the Stonelake landing not to be ignored,” she said. “So Dr. Chan that he was at the forefront and planning to help revitalize the region. “

But she also said that CNU has an incentive to occupy all of the space in the mall.

“It also gives them the return on their investment,” she said.

Looking ahead, Shin Allen emphasized the importance of not ignoring Stone Lake Landing.

“As the mayor, I am responsible for ensuring that this area is fully implemented. It hasn’t been given up, ”she said. “We don’t want another“ ghost mall ”situation in which it annoys and is given up. And I am sure Dr. Chan doesn’t want that either. Because it returns to the value of the land and what they own. “

Singh-Allen called the occupation of the Centre’s offices a “big goal”.

“Since the hospital is not here, the main purpose here is to make sure that all of these rooms are filled and that we have a great business that can thrive,” she says. I did.

“It is very important to me to do this right, not only as a resident of this district, but also as the mayor of this city.”

Jake Rambo, chairman of the Stonelake Homeowners Association, has met Cheung twice and believes he and Cheung see Stonelake Landing as a place with great potential.

“I think Dr. Chan is aware of this possibility whether they decide to do something or transfer the land to someone else,” he said. It was. “I think there is a great opportunity from now on.”

He added that he shared his vision for the center with Chan.

“I have Dr. Chan said Stone Lake Landing can do some very innovative things, ”he said. “We need to get away from thinking about shopping malls surrounding parking lots.

“I want to use it for multiple purposes there and add more restaurants and amenities. I love to see something like an outdoor amphitheater where the community can listen to live music on weekends. . “

Regarding Shin Allen’s efforts at Stone Lake Landing, Rambo said he appreciated her “two-way” approach to making improvements at this mall possible.

He’s also hoping that at some point people will frequent the vibrant Stonelake Landing and keep the taxes in Elk Grove.

“Keep these taxes in Elk Grove and we’ll invest in our community,” said Rambo.

CNU, Mayor hopes to attract new tenants to Stonelake Landing | news Source link CNU, Mayor hopes to attract new tenants to Stonelake Landing | news



Source link

]]>
https://htlhb.com/cnu-mayor-hopes-to-attract-new-tenants-to-stonelake-landing-news/feed/ 0
Traditional shopping malls face challenges in changing retail landscape https://htlhb.com/traditional-shopping-malls-face-challenges-in-changing-retail-landscape/ https://htlhb.com/traditional-shopping-malls-face-challenges-in-changing-retail-landscape/#respond Thu, 08 Jul 2021 11:28:04 +0000 https://htlhb.com/?p=681 Randy Strisko looked around at the empty storefronts at Merritt Square mall, where he has been a retail tenant for more than four decades, and shrugged. Strisko now owns the Shades 4-U sunglass kiosk, which he has operated for the last six years. Before that, he operated two surf shops at different times at the mall. In all […]]]>


Randy Strisko looked around at the empty storefronts at Merritt Square mall, where he has been a retail tenant for more than four decades, and shrugged.

Strisko now owns the Shades 4-U sunglass kiosk, which he has operated for the last six years. Before that, he operated two surf shops at different times at the mall. In all that time, Strisko said, he couldn’t recall seeing as many vacancies as the mall has now.

“COVID took a toll on everybody,” he said.

Oh, how times have changed. For decades, Melbourne Square and Merritt Square malls were the places to shop in Brevard County. Today, Brevard’s two premier malls need to get creative to attract shoppers.

Experts say the changing landscape of retailing, locally and nationally, presents significant challenges for malls and other retail centers like them, as more and more consumers opt to shop online or at open-air “lifestyle centers” like The Avenue Viera or Titus Landing in Titusville.

The coronavirus pandemic exacerbated the challenges, as did last month’s Chapter 11 filing in bankruptcy court for the owner of Melbourne Square and the April 30 shutdown of one of Merritt Square’s anchor tenants, Sears.

But on recent weekday afternoons, both malls had a mix of younger and older shoppers, albeit Melbourne Square appeared busier. The Melbourne mall also had far few store vacancies than Merritt Square.

Mike Slotkin, a professor of economics at Florida Institute of Technology’s Bisk College of Business, points to his own retail spending practices as an example of the plight of traditional malls.

He can’t remember the last time he shopped at a traditional mall — even for clothing and shoes, which in the past he never would purchase without trying the items on first.

“I just point and click, and it’s there,” delivered quickly outside his front door, after he orders the items online. “The world moves on.”

More: Melbourne Square mall owner Washington Prime files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection

More: Sears to close its last Brevard store, on Merritt Island, as part of continued cutbacks

Stephanie Cegielski, vice president of research and public relations at International Council of Shopping Centers, said indoor malls “really took the brunt of it” during the pandemic, as many had to remain closed for expended periods of time. 

This wasn’t as pronounced in Florida, which was a more “open” state compared to states like New York, where the International Council of Shopping Centers is based and where some malls were closed for six months, Cegielski said.

In comparison, Merritt Square, for example, closed for only a month — from April 3 to May 4, 2020 — although some stores had more extended shutdowns.

In a bid to lure in shoppers, a number of conventional shopping malls are shifting their tenant mixes toward having destination attractions other than traditional big-box department stores and other large retail tenants.

Cegielski said these might be a larger concentration of upscale restaurants, movie theater complexes with dining options available inside the theaters, ropes courses, rock-climbing attractions, miniature golf, indoor go-carting, an Apple technology store or a Lululemon athletic apparel store with an attached yoga studio.

Some also are redeveloping mall properties to include condos, creating a “live, work and play type of environment,” Cegielski said.

“You’re always going to have traditional malls, but the consumer evolves and their tastes are changing,” Cegielski said. “It’s a cyclical industry. There are hard times and not-so-hard times.”

‘Unique opportunity’ at Merritt Square

At Merritt Square mall off State Road 520 on Merritt Island, General Manager Shannon Stanley says she is remaining optimistic about the future — even though anchor tenant Sears closed in recent months, as did the mall’s Ruby Tuesday restaurant and the FYE store that sells music, movies and other entertainment products.

Stanley said both FYE and Ruby Tuesday “have scaled down their locations nationwide, but we have already received quite a bit of interest in both blocks. We have over half a dozen deals currently in motion, and a number of additional

opportunities in the pipeline, so we are very optimistic about the future at Merritt Square.” 

Stanley cited the planned move of Health First’s Cape Canaveral Hospital from Cocoa Beach to a site across State Road 520 from Merritt Square as a plus for the mall.

“We have a unique opportunity to create a new hub of activity around our mall,” as a result of the relocation of the hospital, Stanley said. “And we are pivoting our approach to capitalize on the attention our property is receiving in response. Today, we are focusing our leasing strategy on more out-of-the-box and non-traditional opportunities, especially for local businesses that are looking to expand. We’ve also tapped into a small-scale events market.” 

Strisko said he, too, remains optimistic. He has seen potential new tenants checking out space in the mall, and is anxiously awaiting the return of Port Canaveral cruise passengers and ship crew members to the mall, potentially as early as late-July. Cruises have been idled since March 2020 because of the pandemic.

Strisko said many cruise passengers stay on the Space Coast before or after their cruises, and Merritt Square is a key shopping destination for them. Ship crew members also shop at the mall, if they can leave the ship while it is in port for the day — something that may still be restricted by COVID-19 when cruising resumes.

He noted that “the beaches are packed” with tourists, and the opening of a hospital across the street will be “a game-changer” for attracting traffic to Merritt Square.

Strisko also is pleased to see the movie theater complex at Merritt Square back in full operation with first-run movies, as movie patrons are a draw for his sunglass business.

“You’ve got to roll with the times,” Strisko said.

But Gustavo Rondan, manager of the I Cover cellphone repairs and accessories store, is less upbeat.

Rondan’s store location is in a section of the mall that has a number of vacancies, and, except for the weekends, he says business is relatively slow.

“It’s hard to tell,” Rondan said. “People say it’s getting better.”

Rondan said he is banking on the customer service he can deliver — helping people with phone repairs — to keep the business going. He noted that’s not something you can buy online.

Doug and Amy Bailey of Viera were driving past the Merritt Square mall on a recent Friday, and decided to stop in. They said they were a little surprised by all the vacant storefronts.

“I don’t know that they’re going to make it if they can keep stores,” Doug Bailey said.

Amy Bailey added that COVID-19 shifted many retail transactions from in-person to online, and she thought that was evident by what she saw at Merritt Square.

Stanley said she could not disclose the store vacancy rate in the mall, while noting: “We unfortunately have had some brands close their doors over the course of the last few months, many of whom are scaling down their locations nationwide. While it’s certainly disappointing, we’ve received quite a bit of interest in our vacant spaces, and we look forward to announcing a number of new additions soon.”

Stanley said she is optimistic that the initial tenant announcements “will help generate further activity here.”  

Stanley said there are redevelopment plans under consideration for the site, but mall officials aren’t ready to detail them yet.

“The cornerstone of our leasing strategy at the moment is diversification,” Stanley said. “We’ve benefited immensely from our national retailers, and we look forward to adding local restaurants and retailers to that mix. That’s really what we are prioritizing at the moment at Merritt Square.”

Stanley concedes the growth in online sales, but says Merritt Square is trying to combat that, recognizing there are things about in-person shopping that an Amazon Prime transaction can’t deliver.

“We are working hard to transform Merritt Square into a hub of commercial activity, from welcoming local vendors and pop-up retail markets, to musical guests and dance performances,” Stanley said. “If the pandemic has taught us anything, it’s that people really crave those types of in-person experiences and interactions. We are building something that isn’t really comparable to anything you can do online, so we don’t see our center as in competition with those services. I think that’s been reflected in the foot traffic we’re seeing, and we look forward to continuing to identify ways we can engage both locals and visitors on-property.”

The departure of Sears provides uncertainty into how that retail space will be filled, as the brand “owns and operates the building independently,” Stanley said. But she said the mall is open to working alongside Sears to find the right fit.

She also said some Merritt Square retailers are reporting sales volume as being on par or exceeding 2019 levels, but could not disclose which retailers they were.

Melbourne Square says it’s ‘business as usual’

Melbourne Square mall’s owner, the Washington Prime Group, in June filed for Chapter 11 protection in U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

But the Ohio-based company contends that will not affect day-to-day operations there or at the company’s other shopping center properties.

“It’s business as usual at Melbourne Square mall,” the company said in a statement to FLORIDA TODAY. “The COVID-19 pandemic has created significant challenges for many consumer-facing companies, including Washington Prime Group. The company has determined that the Chapter 11 path is the most effective next step to resolve the company’s outstanding indebtedness, as we emerge from the pandemic.”

Washington Prime said that “throughout the Chapter 11 financial restructuring, we expect business as usual at Melbourne Square mall, where our tenants, sponsors and employees will continue operating as normal, with a focus on providing enjoyable experiences for our guests.”

Melbourne Square General Manager Cindy Rodenhizer said the mall earlier this year added what it calls “The Hub” to its Center Court.

Rodenhizer describes it as “collaborative space (that) offers guests a place to work, connect and create, either by themselves or with others.”

On a recent Thursday afternoon, that space was sporadically occupied by individuals and small groups of people checking their phone, doing work or meeting with one another.

Rodenhizer lists as among the tenants that filled retail slots at the mall in 2020 as Art Blvd, J&F Latin, Jungle Range, LA7, Maccabi USA, Sky Kone and Turtle Bags. This year, they were joined by It’s Different, Paris Palace Luxury Haircare, The Pizza Place, Tik Tok and Trendz. And, later this year, among those joining the mall lineup will be Crepes & Salad Vibes, Go Green CBD, Mr. & Mrs. Crab and Wooden Spoon. 

Most are not exactly household names to shoppers. But they do provide diverse offerings for people visiting the mall, located off West New Haven Avenue/U.S. 192.

Katlyn Danzell, assistant manager of the Art Blvd art and gift store store at Melbourne Square, said business is starting to pick up.

“We get really busy on weekends, Danzell said. “Business is decent around here.”

Michael Gargano, a sales associate at Globall Sports store at Melbourne Square, which sell professional and college team apparel and caps, noted that “it’s been kind of tough in the past year. It just depends on the day.”

Noting that Globall Sports closed a mall store in Vero Beach last year, Gargano said: “We just want to keep this business going,” along with its stores in Jensen Beach and  Lawrenceville, Georgia.

Gargano said the increased number of fans at sports events and the start of college and pro football seasons should help boost sales at Globall Sports stores.

Ronald Peoples, an aeronautics engineer from Melbourne, visited Melbourne Square on a recent Thursday afternoon and liked what he saw.

“It’s clean, and the people are friendly,” Peoples said.

He added that in-person shopping at malls is “not the way it used to be, but it’s coming back.”

Melbourne Square also is seeking to attract visitors through various community events inside the mall.

Rodenhizer cited a “Beat the Heat” event for families in June and an early back-to-school supply drive. A back-to-school party and teacher appreciation event is scheduled for Aug. 7.

“Melbourne Square is embracing our role as a community partner by finding unique ways to transform our space for social good,” Rodenhizer said. “Additionally, through our WPG Cares initiative, Melbourne Square strives to support community members through goodwill initiatives, such as food donation drives, blood drives and other events.”

Melbourne Square is the second local shopping center within the last year to have its owner enter Chapter 11 proceedings. 

More: Hammock Landing mall owner files for bankruptcy amid COVID-19 pandemic

In November, CBL & Associates Properties Inc., the owner of the Hammock Landing shopping complex in West Melbourne, announced it had filed for Chapter 11 protection in U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas.

“CBL’s properties will continue to operate as normal, and customers can expect business as usual throughout this process,” Stacey Keating, a company spokesperson, said at the time.

The Avenue provides indoor/outdoor mix

Michelle Reyes, marketing coordinator for The Avenue Viera, said customer traffic and sales at Viera’s open-air shopping center have recovered to exceed the pre-pandemic levels of 2019.

She believes many people have grown tired of being cooped up during the pandemic, and want to interact in public.

“People are just happy to leave their house again,” Reyes said.

But, Reyes added, some are more comfortable in an open-air mall like The Avenue — where they can “pop outside” into the fresh air between visiting stores — rather than going to a traditional enclosed mall.

Reyes said, unlike many enclosed malls, The Avenue was able to remain open throughout the pandemic, although some of its tenants did temporary close.

More: Shopping local during holiday season has ripple effects in Brevard County | Opinion

Among additions to The Avenue in the past year are J. Vanover & Co. Furniture; Lululemon; a Shabby Loft store that sells art, crafts, jewelry and woodworking items; a Sephora beauty-products store; and Taj: Modern Indian Cuisine.

Also relatively new to the mall is 7 Senses Kids, a gift shop for mothers and children, combined with a site that offers pediatric therapy services at its occupational therapy studio. 

Reyes expects several more tenants to open before Christmas, including Sola Salon Studios. The location will feature 34 individual salon studios designed for professionals in the cosmetology industry, including hair stylists, barbers, estheticians, eyebrow artists, makeup artist, massage therapist, nail technicians and other beauty-related professionals.

Reyes said she believes The Avenue has a strong mix of locally owned and national retailers and casual and fine-dining restaurants, many of the latter offering outdoor dining. Plus an experiential attraction — Urban Air Adventure Park — which Reyes described as “a mainstay” of the complex.

Also boosting The Avenue is the strong housing construction market in the Viera area.

“We feel positive about the shopping experience,” Reyes said.

Reyes said, even with the increase in online shopping, there are instances in which businesses that start out as online-only grow to the point at which they want to expand to a bricks-and-mortar location in The Avenue or elsewhere.

Despite the challenges traditional enclosed malls in Brevard and elsewhere face, Reyes said she is optimistic about their future.

“We hope our local malls do well,” Reyes said. “We hope they will stay strong and rebound. When they do well, we do well.”

Titus Landing succeeds at site of failed mall

In Titusville, the Titus Landing open-air shopping center was built on the site of the once-popular — but since-failed and torn-down — Miracle City Mall off U.S. 1.

“The center is doing well, and it’s attracting shoppers,” said Cliff Aiken, chief investment officer for Ohio-based Exxcel Property Management LLC, which owns and manages Titus Landing. “We feel like we’re the No. 1 destination” in the Titusville area.

Aiken describes Titus Landing as “more of an entertainment center,” than a traditional shopping center, with its Epic Theatres movie complex and its large concentration of sit-down and quick-serve restaurants.

“I believe people like to get out for dinner and get out for entertainment,” Aiken said.

Unlike the Melbourne Square and Merritt Square malls, Titus Landing’s anchor tenants are not the traditional major department stores like J.C. Penney and Macy’s. Rather, they are such retail draws as Beall, Hobby Lobby, Pet Supermarket, Tuesday Morning and Ulta Beauty.

More: Chipotle Mexican Grill set to open this fall at TitusLanding in south Titusville

Aiken said the increased single-family home and apartment construction in the Titusville area is helping attract customers to retail complex, as is the presence of the Parrish Healthcare Center at Titus Landing.

“Parrish is a significant player for us,” Aiken said.

More: Demolition of Searstown Mall could begin next year, developer says

Not far from Titus Landing along U.S. 1, the struggling Titusville Mall (formerly known as Searstown Mall), is looking for a transformation as well. A current proposal calls for the demolition of that retail center as early as next year as part of an overall project to bring 162,000 square feet of retail space and 340 new apartments to the property.

What the future may hold

Slotkin, the Florida Tech professor, said the momentum of online ordering “for everything from cat food to toiletries to clothing” will be a difficult obstacle for retail malls.

“COVID just forced certain things to take hold,” Slotkin said.

On the other side of the equation, Slotkin said, is the fact that “people are social creatures, and want to get out and be with other people. They have a thirst to get out and do something social. They can’t just sit in their house all day, all the time. They want real contact, not Zoom contact, not phone contact.”

A key could be the right mix of tenants, including higher-end and specialty store, that would encourage shoppers to venture out to “sample the wares,” he said.

International Council of Shopping Centers official Cegielski said “people are looking to travel and they’re looking to shop. People are definitely going out and spending again.” She said that includes buying clothes for work after extended periods for many of working from home, clothes for vacations, and clothes for visits to restaurants and clubs.

She noted that, although online shopping continues to increase, it is increasing at a pace that is less than a year ago. In May, for example, online shopping volume was up 8% from May 2020. In comparison, the increase was 29%, comparing May 2019 to May 2020, she said. 

Dalzell, the Art Blvd assistant manager, said, personally, “I would prefer to go shopping in public, and see the clothing and try on the clothing,” rather than shopping online.

Reyes at The Avenue Viera says that among the things that Brevard County has going for it is its growing market size.

In the past, many national retailers saw the Space Coast “as really green” — both literally as having many undeveloped areas and figuratively as not being ready for some major retailers to enter.

“Now,” Reyes said, “we are becoming much more desirable as a place to open new locations in.”

Dave Berman is business editor at FLORIDA TODAY. Contact Berman at dberman@floridatoday.com. Twitter: @bydaveberman.

If stories like this are important to you, please consider subscribing to FLORIDA TODAY. To subscribe: https://cm.floridatoday.com/specialoffer/





Source link

]]>
https://htlhb.com/traditional-shopping-malls-face-challenges-in-changing-retail-landscape/feed/ 0
Car and Driver Answers 20 Questions about EVs https://htlhb.com/car-and-driver-answers-20-questions-about-evs/ https://htlhb.com/car-and-driver-answers-20-questions-about-evs/#respond Wed, 07 Jul 2021 12:37:41 +0000 https://htlhb.com/?p=669 Why should I care about EVs? A good story always comes with a hefty dose of tension. Like a romance set on the decks of a cruise ship that everyone knows is about to sink. Or a superhero movie twisting time and space to keep you wondering whether the good guys will get hold of […]]]>


Why should I care about EVs?

A good story always comes with a hefty dose of tension. Like a romance set on the decks of a cruise ship that everyone knows is about to sink. Or a superhero movie twisting time and space to keep you wondering whether the good guys will get hold of the gems before the bad guy wins (again). Last fall, when we were brainstorming stories for 2021, the idea of sending most of the staff on a long road rally in electric cars seemed perfect. Inject a little range anxiety into a trip and you have the makings of a fun tale.

Turns out, our timing was pretty good. Ever since we started plotting the rally, automakers have unveiled more and more plans for more and more EVs of all shapes and sizes. According to IHS Markit, electric vehicles accounted for just 1.8 percent of the market last year, but analysts predict that number will rise to more than 10 percent by 2025. Love them or hate them, you’ll be seeing many more EVs on the road in the next few years.

It will take a shifting mindset for traditional car enthusiasts to learn to love EVs. When you’ve spent your years understanding engine purrs and roars as indicators of something very right (or wrong), chucking a quiet EV into a few corners can be jarring, and many of the canned noises automakers offer for false feedback are too alien to be cool. It can feel like something elemental is missing. After driving 11 electric cars for three weeks, we realized that EVs require a certain recalibration of what qualifies as fun. Which doesn’t mean the new fun isn’t as good as the old. Accelerating onto the highway with all of that immediate torque at your foot is a blast. Stopping to charge for a half-hour every now and then on a road trip lessens the pressure to just power through to your destination.

You can stomp and moan about change, but it is in­evitable. When the first human built a hut, some caveman undoubtedly complained it wouldn’t be as sturdy as his cave. And he wasn’t necessarily wrong, but the hut gained market share anyway. Change is coming, and we plan to embrace it, critique it, and push the industry to keep making cars that enthusiasts of all stripes can love. —Sharon Carty

2. Where will the electricity come from?

EV advocates regularly bust two myths that our electric infrastructure can’t support EVs en masse. The first suggests that the rising volume of EVs will demand so much power that utilities won’t be able to supply it. On the contrary, these companies have no problem supplying electricity to EV buyers—presuming most charge their cars overnight. That’s when extra generation capacity goes unused because demand is lowest. Many utilities already offer cheaper rates to incentivize off-hour energy use, and every EV on sale today allows you to schedule charging—so you can plug in your vehicle when you park and delay charging until the lower rate kicks in.

Illustrations by Daniel ZalkusCar and Driver

The second myth: EVs will bring down the electrical grid. In neighborhoods with many EVs, a higher-capacity transformer may be needed, but utilities are used to making those upgrades as new construction increases electrical demands. Adapting for increasing numbers of EVs shouldn’t be any different.

A 2019 Department of Energy report found that the mass adoption of EVs “will not pose significantly greater challenges than past evolutions of the U.S. electric power system.” In the long run, EVs may even add stability to the grid. Ford says the F-150 Lightning will eventually be able to power a house during peak demand to save homeowners money and ease pressure on utilities. —John Voelcker

how does the outside temperature affect range

Jenny RisherCar and Driver

3. How does the outside temperature affect range?

The further the ambient temperature deviates from the mid-70s, the more energy is devoted to keeping the cabin’s occupants—and, in some cases, the battery—comfortable. Because extreme temperatures can irreversibly damage battery cells, EVs will heat or cool the pack as needed to protect it. Testing five EVs in mixed-use driving with the HVAC systems running, AAA found that, on average, range dropped by 41 percent when the temperature fell from 75 degrees to 20. At 95 degrees, range was reduced by 17 percent compared with the 75-degree baseline. Drivers can somewhat reduce the range-zapping effect of extreme temperatures by scheduling their departures—all EVs have this capability—so that the cabin and battery are preconditioned while the vehicle is plugged in and using power from the grid. —K.C. Colwell

4. Are EVs actually environmentally friendly?

If we only built cars and never drove them, Camaros, not Model 3s, might be the darlings of the environmental movement. EV batteries are energy-intensive to manufacture, and there are humanitarian costs associated with mining the metals they rely on. Though EVs don’t emit greenhouse gases, the electricity they pull from the grid often does . . . Read More

5. Should I worry about the electromagnetic radiation an EV gives off?

should i worry about the electromagnetic radiation an ev gives off

You can put away your tinfoil hat and lead underpants—your electric vehicle is safe. It’s true that an EV’s powertrain components—battery pack, wiring, motor(s)—produce more electromagnetic radiation than an internal-combustion engine, but it’s negligible. The Norwegian research group SINTEF found that radiation readings inside an EV were well below the limits recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Radiation exposure near the vehicle floor is less than 20 percent of the limit, and at head height, it’s less than 2 percent. —David Beard

6. How much range do I need?

range finder

7. Can I tow with an EV?

We wouldn’t recommend it. When manufacturers design EVs, towing isn’t top of mind. Several models on the market today don’t have tow ratings, and those that do can tug only modest loads. It makes sense: EVs are aerodynamically slippery, and attaching a trailer to one is like strapping a parachute and ankle weights on a marathon runner . . . Read More

8. Are plug-in hybrids brilliant or dumb?

are plugin hybrids brilliant or dumb

Plug-in hybrids (PHEVs) as a whole are hard to characterize because there are so many approaches to combining gas engines and electric motors in a single powertrain. To figure out whether a given PHEV is worthwhile, simply consider this: Does it have useful electric range and a powerful-enough motor (or motors) to exploit that range without the combustion engine kicking on? That’s crucial, because the ideal PHEV-use scenario is everyday electric driving combined with the long-distance convenience of gas. You want one with an electric motor that makes more than 100 horsepower and is good for at least 20 miles on electricity. As a shortcut, look for a PHEV that qualifies for the full $7500 federal tax credit—an indication that it’s serious about its electric range. Which brings us to an obvious point: A plug-in will always be a dumb purchase if you never plug it in. The EPA scores the PHEV Jeep Wrangler 4xe at 20 mpg combined once the battery is depleted. The four-cylinder Wrangler—which weighs 800 pounds less, according to Jeep—beats it with a 22-mpg estimate. —Ezra Dyer

9. What happens when an EV runs out of juice?

As an EV’s battery gets to a very low state of charge, the vehicle typically reduces the available power and alerts the driver to find a charging station or pull over. At this point, if you can’t plug in, range anxiety devolves into panic, which is usually followed by a call for help from the side of the road. As in gas-powered cars, automakers’ approaches to distance-to-empty readouts vary. In some EVs, such as the Audi e-tron and Jaguar I-Pace, zero means zero. We have the tow-truck receipts to prove it. Others, such as those made by Ford, Tesla, Volvo, and Polestar, provide several miles of buffer even after the predicted range is down to nil. Here’s another wrinkle: After the high-voltage battery pack is dead, you run the risk of depleting the 12-volt accessory battery. If that happens, the vehicle won’t charge until the accessory battery is replenished. Consider yourself warned. —Dave VanderWerp

10. What do all these new terms and acronyms mean?

BEV

Battery-electric vehicle.

CCS

Combined Charging System, the DC fast-charging connector most automakers use in the U.S.

CHAdeMO

CHArge de MOve, an uncommon DC fast-charging connector. The Nissan Leaf and Mitsu­bishi Outlander PHEV are the only vehicles currently on sale in the U.S. with this port.

Charger

The onboard hardware in an EV responsible for converting alternating current to direct current to charge the battery. Commonly misused to describe a charging station or the cord that connects an EV to an electricity source. See: EVSE.

EVSE

Electric-vehicle supply equipment, the industry term for what most folks refer to as a charger. It includes public charging stations and other equipment carried in the car or installed at home to connect the EV to a source of electricity.

ICE

Internal-combustion engine. Also used as a verb when an ICE car is parked in a space designated for EV charging, thus preventing an EV driver from plugging in. Example: “I couldn’t charge my Tesla because some jerk ICE’d the spot with their brodozer.”

J1772

The SAE standard for EV charging and the connector all non-Tesla EVs in the U.S. use for Level 1 and 2 charging.

kW

Kilowatt, equal to 1000 watts, a unit of power commonly used to describe electric-vehicle charging and the power output of an EV’s motor.

kWh

Kilowatt-hour, a unit of energy equal to 1 kilowatt being sustained for one hour. A gallon of gas contains approximately 33.7 kWh of energy.

Level 1

Describes 120-volt AC charging with a power output around 1 kilowatt, which typically adds no more than five miles of range per hour.

Level 2

Describes 240-volt AC charging you might see at homes, offices, and shopping centers. Level 2 connections typically offer 6 to 19 kilowatts and can fully charge an EV overnight, but the charging rate may be limited by the onboard charger too.

Level 3

High-power, direct-current fast-charging, which bypasses an EV’s onboard charger to feed the battery pack directly. Typical power ranges from 50 to 350 kilowatts, which allows an EV to gain substantial range—100 miles or more—within an hour.

MPGe

Miles per gallon of gasoline equivalent, a measure of efficiency for EVs, PHEVs, and hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles that can be compared to a gas vehicle’s mpg.

PHEV

Plug-in-hybrid electric vehicle, which uses both internal-combustion and electric power sources and has a battery that can be charged by plugging in.

Regenerative braking

Using the electric motors to decelerate a vehicle by converting kinetic energy into electricity, which is stored in the battery pack.

SOC

State of charge, the level of energy currently stored in a battery pack expressed as a percentage of its usable capacity. —Maxwell B. Mortimer

11. When will Americans start buying EVs in large volumes?

when will americans start buying evs in large volumes

It’s all about the combo of the right body style at the right price point at the right range and getting the consumer confident about access to charging infrastructure, whether it’s public or at home. Part of me wants to say now, because you can almost check all the boxes. But by 2025, I think it will be a whole different game. In the next four years, we’ll achieve that scale. —Lea Malloy, head of research and development, Cox Automotive

12. Does an EV’s battery degrade like a cellphone’s?

Yes. A battery pack’s ability to store energy will deteriorate based on numerous factors. Charging habits are the biggest variable. Replenishing to maximum capacity and running the battery down until you see the “Pull over now” warning will weaken the anodes within its cells. To increase longevity, manufacturers typically recommend charging to a threshold of 80 to 90 percent for daily use. GM claims it’s found a way to avoid this strain [see page 26], but no one has a good solution to combat battery deterioration caused by extreme climates.

Most automakers warranty their packs for eight years and 100,000 miles. Our long-term Tesla Model 3—covered for 120,000 miles—has lost 7.6 percent of its battery capacity over 33,000 miles. If this rate persists, we’ll come just shy of qualifying for replacement under Tesla’s 70-percent-capacity-retention policy. —David Beard

13. How do I prep my garage for an EV?

You’ll want a dedicated 240-volt circuit for charging your car. A professional installation generally runs between $750 and $1750, plus the price of permits, according to Qmerit, a company that specializes in this kind of work. If your current electrical supply can’t handle the extra load, you’ll need a new service line run to your house, pushing your cost to the high end of that range. A modest house with 150-amp or higher service can perhaps squeeze in an additional 30- or 40-amp circuit, but it depends on whether there are other large draws, such as a tankless water heater, an electric stove or dryer, or a hot tub. In addition, you may have to purchase charging equipment to connect your EV to the new circuit . . . Read More

14. Can I own an EV without home 240-volt charging?

Sure, just like you can theoretically browse today’s internet with a 14.4k dial-up connection. A standard 120-volt (a.k.a. Level 1) household plug adds only a few miles of range per hour, so replenishing a large battery pack from empty can take days. You might be able to make do if you regularly drive less than 30 miles a day or have access to charging equipment at work. Using a local DC fast-charger like it’s a gas station might be tempting, but it comes at a cost. Charging at Electrify America stations can be more than three times as expensive as using residential electricity, and fast-charging can reduce a battery’s longevity. A survey by UC Davis found that 21 percent of Californians who owned a plug-in eventually gave up on the technology. Among those who quit the electric life, 71 percent did not have 240-volt (Level 2) charging at home. —David Beard

15. How does the EV tax credit work?

Come filing time, it gives new-EV buyers a one-time break ranging from $2500 to $7500 depending on the vehicle’s gross battery capacity (we report usable battery capacity, which is always lower). But there’s a catch: If your taxes don’t exceed the amount your vehicle qualifies for, you won’t get a check in the mail for the difference. For example, someone whose income puts them on the hook for $5000 over the course of the year can’t pocket $2500 from a $7500 credit. In 2020, a single person would’ve needed a taxable income of at least $53,200 to qualify for the full kickback. Another thing to look out for: Once a carmaker has sold 200,000 plug-in vehicles (so far, that’s just GM and Tesla), the credit enters a yearlong phaseout period, after which vehicles that manufacturer sells become ineligible. If all of this sounds too complicated, consider leasing. Though the automaker claims the tax credit, many pass those savings on to you in the form of a lower monthly payment. —Annie White

16. Are used EVs the bargains they appear to be?

While Teslas hold their value relatively well, EVs in general depreciate quicker than gas-powered cars. On average, after three years, EVs lose 13 percent more of their value than gas sedans, according to a study from iSeeCars.com. For a good deal on a great car, we recommend looking for a Chevy Bolt, a former 10Best winner. Cars with under 30,000 miles go for less than $20,000, and the EPA-estimated 238 miles of range is competitive with what several $50,000-plus new EVs can manage.

When shopping for used electric vehicles, maintenance history is less of a concern than with gas cars, but you’ll want to verify the health of the battery. The easiest way to do this is to fully charge the vehicle and see how the predicted range compares with the original advertised range. Are the numbers close? If so, good. Also, while a “Southern car” may be a selling point for a gas-powered vehicle, that’s not necessarily the case for an EV; hot climates can take a toll on battery health. —Connor Hoffman

17. Is an EV cheaper to own than a gas car?

This one’s too close to call. We calculated the five-year cost of ownership for the electric Volkswagen ID.4 and the similarly sized and equipped gas-powered Tiguan. The ID.4’s higher price means more interest if you’re financing (our figures are based on a 60-month loan at 3.11 percent APR with $3000 down). The EV is also more expensive for a 29-year-old man to insure, per GEICO. And Black Book tells us the ID.4 will retain just 32 percent of its value compared with 41 percent for the Tiguan. But the EV saves on maintenance and fuel (assuming 10,000 miles a year with gas at $2.96 per gallon and electricity at $0.13 per kilowatt-hour). With the federal tax credit, the total five-year costs are nearly equal. —Joey Capparella

is an ev cheaper to own than a gas car

18. Will EVs ever be as affordable as today’s cheapest gas cars?

will evs ever be as affordable as today's cheapest gas cars

I believe it’s possible to get EVs close to about $20,000, but that will depend on segment and range. That could be the case for small cars in the U.S. by 2030. By then, they could have an efficiency of 0.23 to 0.25 kilowatt-hours per mile, and a roughly 50-kWh battery—providing about 200 miles of real-world range—would be less than $3000. —Nikolas Soulopoulos, analyst, BloombergNEF

19. Is a battery breakthrough imminent?

is a battery breakthrough imminent

Investors have poured billions into research on more advanced batteries, with solid-state cells the most promising contender. They would replace today’s liquid electrolyte—the solution ions travel through as a battery charges and discharges—with a solid material. Solid-state cells promise greater energy density, reduced costs, and lower risk of fire than conventional lithium-ion batteries. But developing new types of cells, from the first lab tests to widespread implementation in EVs, has historically taken a decade.

Carmakers are optimistic for the long term: Toyota does its own R&D on solid-state cells, Volkswagen has backed QuantumScape for years, and Ford and BMW recently increased their investments in Solid Power. The first EVs with these cells could arrive as soon as 2025, but high initial costs may confine them to the top end of the market. We predict that affordable EVs using this tech are at least a decade away. —John Voelcker

20. Is now the right time to buy an EV?

“I’ll wait till next year.” Stalling on an electric-vehicle purchase has been a tempting strategy since the inception of the modern mainstream EV. Year by year, range increased, charging got easier, and manufacturers rolled out better electric options. But as barriers were removed, so too were early-adopter perks. Tesla stopped giving away free electricity at its Superchargers. GM and Tesla vehicles became ineligible for the federal tax credit. Primo parking spots with Level 2 charging are no longer perpetually empty, awaiting the stray futurist in a Model S. This is the inflection point . . . Read More

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io



Source link

]]>
https://htlhb.com/car-and-driver-answers-20-questions-about-evs/feed/ 0
S. Korean retailers’ confidence improves for the third quarter https://htlhb.com/s-korean-retailers-confidence-improves-for-the-third-quarter/ https://htlhb.com/s-korean-retailers-confidence-improves-for-the-third-quarter/#respond Tue, 06 Jul 2021 00:06:56 +0000 https://htlhb.com/s-korean-retailers-confidence-improves-for-the-third-quarter/ A mall in west Seoul is full of shoppers, in this photo from May 16, 2021. (Yonhap) A majority of South Korean retailers expect their business conditions to improve further in the third quarter of 2021 than three months earlier, as more people will be vaccinated against the new coronavirus, a poll on Tuesday found. […]]]>


A mall in west Seoul is full of shoppers, in this photo from May 16, 2021. (Yonhap)

A majority of South Korean retailers expect their business conditions to improve further in the third quarter of 2021 than three months earlier, as more people will be vaccinated against the new coronavirus, a poll on Tuesday found.

The Korean Chamber of Commerce and Industry announced that its Retail Business Survey Index (RBSI) was 106 for July-September, up from 103 three months earlier.

It’s the second straight quarter that the country’s RBSI has stayed above levels. In the second quarter, the index slightly outperformed the benchmark for the first time since the COVID-19 outbreak in January last year.

The number is based on a survey of around 1,000 retail companies across the country. A value above 100 means that the optimists outnumber the pessimists.

The internet-based retailer index was highest at 115, thanks to increased contactless consumption and expectations that more anti-coronavirus vaccinations could boost consumer spending.

The RBSI for department stores rose from 96 to 107 over the period, the largest increase among the retail sectors from the previous quarter, which is expected to lead the industry’s recovery.

Other offline retailers, however, were cautious. The index for large discounters was 98, for convenience stores at 100 and for supermarkets at 96.

The optimistic mood among retailers comes from the fact that Asia’s fourth largest economy has quickly recovered from the impact of the pandemic on buoyant exports and domestic demand.

South Korean consumers remain optimistic about the economy. South Korea’s consumer sentiment hit 110.3 in June, 5.1 points more than in May, marking the sixth straight month on the rise, according to the central bank. (Yonhap)



Source link

]]>
https://htlhb.com/s-korean-retailers-confidence-improves-for-the-third-quarter/feed/ 0
Glorious Days of the Foster Theater in Youngstown revisited | News, sports, jobs https://htlhb.com/glorious-days-of-the-foster-theater-in-youngstown-revisited-news-sports-jobs/ https://htlhb.com/glorious-days-of-the-foster-theater-in-youngstown-revisited-news-sports-jobs/#respond Sun, 04 Jul 2021 04:20:50 +0000 https://htlhb.com/glorious-days-of-the-foster-theater-in-youngstown-revisited-news-sports-jobs/ Ian Beniston, Executive Director of Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corp., stands outside the Foster Theater on Glenwood Avenue. The YNDC acquired the property to repair it and improve the neighborhood. Beniston said YNDC plans to upgrade the marquee and facade, but it has not yet been decided how the building will be used. The theater has […]]]>


Ian Beniston, Executive Director of Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corp., stands outside the Foster Theater on Glenwood Avenue. The YNDC acquired the property to repair it and improve the neighborhood. Beniston said YNDC plans to upgrade the marquee and facade, but it has not yet been decided how the building will be used. The theater has been closed since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. ..Employee Photo / Ed Runyan

YOUNGSTOWN – One of the people most excited to hear that Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corp. bought the closed Foster Theater on Glenwood Avenue is Steven “Shags” Shagrin of Walnut Beach, California.

Shagrin is a grandson of Joseph Shagrin Sr., the man who built and ran the Foster from December 26, 1938 until he retired in December 1965.

Steven’s grandfather had the vision of building a movie theater in a neighborhood and, according to his obituary, chose a location near Idora Park and Mill Creek Park on the city’s South Side. He had predicted the expansion of business into the neighborhood before shopping malls became popular.

“My grandfather was the very first to break away from downtown,” noted Steven. “He said, ‘You have to put it in the neighborhood. That’s where the people are. ‘ That was awesome because the bus route ran from Mill Creek Park to Idora Park. And what was on the way? The Foster Theater. People could go to Fosterville, they could see a movie for a dime, a dime, maybe a quarter. “

Years later, “everyone moved to the suburbs,” said Steven.

Although the Foster Theater has been an X-rated cinema for the past few decades, a 1938 Foster advertisement stated that it was once “healthy entertainment for the whole family all the time.”

Steven Shagrin grew up in the Youngstown area and moved to California in 2006. It was only after his grandfather’s death that he realized the value of learning more about his grandfather, he said.

“I wish I had a chance to speak to him about his early years in the entertainment business,” said Steven. “I was 17 when he died so I was just coming of age and I wanted to know my family history and he couldn’t remember anything.”

ART FILMS

As director of the theater, Joseph Shagrin Sr. was “among the first neighborhood house managers to recognize the importance of art films,” says his obituary. He later “made it one of the leading art theaters in the country for a town the size of Youngstown”.

He died on April 1, 1974.

Joseph and his twin brother Max grew up in Youngstown and knew the Youngstown Warner brothers – Harry, Sam, Albert, and Jack.

The Warner family invested in a movie projector in the early 20th century and traveled through Ohio, Pennsylvania and neighboring states to show movies in tents, according to ohiohistorycentral.org.

The brothers bought their first movie theater in New Castle, Pennsylvania in 1903 and then invested in other theaters in the Youngstown area.

The brothers began producing films in 1907, founded a film production company in California in 1918, and founded Warner Bros. Co .. in 1923.

They built the Warner Theater – now known as the DeYor Performing Arts Center – on West Federal Street in downtown Youngstown in 1931.

ATYPICAL STYLE

The Foster Theater building has an architectural style that is “untypical of the Mahoning Valley,” and worth preserving, said Ian Beniston, executive director of Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corp.

He said the YNDC plans to restore the theater’s marquee and facade, but it has not yet been decided how the building will be used.

With the theater showing X-rated films for so long, the neighborhood residents didn’t see it very positively. Beniston said he wants to change that perception.

“There wasn’t a lot of neighborhood loyalty,” he said.

“It’s hard to see in its current state, but it’s important to preserve buildings like this,” he said. “You couldn’t rebuild it if you’d tried.”

He said the cost of renovating the theater is likely to be “seven figures.”

The YNDC has created a gofundme page to raise funds for the renovation. The title is “Restore the Foster Theater Marquee!”.

Many are not aware that the building was designed in such a way that it has a theater in the middle, but two shops to the left and right of the theater entrance. Steven Shagrin recalls that it had a flower shop on the left and a candy store on the right.

EARLY CAREER

The twin brothers had significant careers in the entertainment industry and worked in the Youngstown theater business for many years.

In the 1920s, Joseph Shagrin Sr. ran the Park Theater, which opened on South Champion Street in 1901.

The Park Theater was the training ground for Al Jolson, who, according to the IMDb website, “had been known in the industry for well over 40 years as“ the world’s greatest entertainer ”. Jolson was a longtime friend of the Shagrins, the obituary says.

Early in his career, Joseph worked as the manager of the Grand Opera House on the southwest corner of Central Square, Youngstown’s first real theater, which opened in 1872, according to the cinematreasures.org website.

The Shagrin twins were Jack Warner’s classmates, and Joseph Shagrin gave Jack of Warner Brothers his first entertainment job.

Max Shagrin later worked for the Warner Brothers and was zone manager for 14 Warner Brothers cinemas in Los Angeles.

Max later became one of Hollywood’s most famous agents, according to Joseph Shagrin’s obituary.

Warner Bros. Entertainment, now owned by Time Warner, is the No. 1 film production company of all time according to reelrundown.com.

Max Shagrin died in Hollywood in 1969. Steven said he and his father Joseph Shagrin Jr. found many Vindicator articles about the twins at Max Shagrin’s California home after Max died.

erunyan@vindy.com

Get the latest news and more in your inbox



Source link

]]>
https://htlhb.com/glorious-days-of-the-foster-theater-in-youngstown-revisited-news-sports-jobs/feed/ 0
US construction spending down 0.3% in May https://htlhb.com/us-construction-spending-down-0-3-in-may/ https://htlhb.com/us-construction-spending-down-0-3-in-may/#respond Fri, 02 Jul 2021 06:54:09 +0000 https://htlhb.com/us-construction-spending-down-0-3-in-may/ WASHINGTON – US construction spending declined 0.3% in May. Growth in housing construction, the foremost performer in the economy, slowed while activity in areas hardest hit by the pandemic continued to show weakness. The Commerce Department reported Thursday that the May decline followed a slight 0.1% increase in April, and total construction spending rose 7.5% […]]]>


WASHINGTON – US construction spending declined 0.3% in May. Growth in housing construction, the foremost performer in the economy, slowed while activity in areas hardest hit by the pandemic continued to show weakness.

The Commerce Department reported Thursday that the May decline followed a slight 0.1% increase in April, and total construction spending rose 7.5% year over year.

Housing construction, which was a driving force behind the economy during the pandemic, saw a tiny 0.2% gain in May as single-family housing construction rose 0.8% while apartments and other apartment buildings remained flat. Last year residential construction increased by 28.7% and single-family house construction by a whopping 46.1%.

Non-residential construction activity declined 1.1% in May, with hotel and motel construction and the category that includes shopping malls, two areas hit hard by the pandemic closings, both declining. Last year, non-residential construction fell 5.8%, while the hotel and motel category fell 23.2%.

Spending on government projects fell slightly by 0.2% in May and is down 8.7% last year, reflecting pressure on many levels of government from falling tax revenues.

Nancy Vanden Houten, an economist at Oxford Economics, said she believes the huge gap between housing and non-housing will narrow “as private investment in non-residential properties rebounds as the recovery accelerates”.

She said supply chain restrictions on lumber and other building materials could dampen growth in both residential and non-residential spending for a while. However, she said the recent slump in timber prices should ease cost pressures after a sharp rise in prices.

The various changes in May resulted in a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $ 1.545 trillion.

Print headline: US construction spending down 0.3% in May



Source link

]]>
https://htlhb.com/us-construction-spending-down-0-3-in-may/feed/ 0
The family visiting Vacaville has a car broken into and their brother’s ashes stolen https://htlhb.com/the-family-visiting-vacaville-has-a-car-broken-into-and-their-brothers-ashes-stolen/ https://htlhb.com/the-family-visiting-vacaville-has-a-car-broken-into-and-their-brothers-ashes-stolen/#respond Thu, 01 Jul 2021 01:23:34 +0000 https://htlhb.com/the-family-visiting-vacaville-has-a-car-broken-into-and-their-brothers-ashes-stolen/ VACAVILLE, Calif. (KTXL) – A family visiting Vacaville from abroad was devastated after breaking into their rental car and stealing a backpack containing their brother’s ashes Tuesday morning. “Most of the time we’re just sad because we couldn’t fulfill Tim’s last wish to bring him home and stay with his family,” said Kristal Horne. Horne […]]]>


VACAVILLE, Calif. (KTXL) – A family visiting Vacaville from abroad was devastated after breaking into their rental car and stealing a backpack containing their brother’s ashes Tuesday morning.

“Most of the time we’re just sad because we couldn’t fulfill Tim’s last wish to bring him home and stay with his family,” said Kristal Horne.

Horne promised her brother Tim Horne, before he died of cancer in January, that his family would return to their hometown of Vacaville and scatter his ashes in his favorite spots.

“We wanted to visit some of the places Tim grew up in and I wanted to show that this is basically his life in Vacaville,” Horne explained.

But the trip took a terrible turn when Horne received a desperate call from her brother’s sister-in-law, who had stopped for a quick breakfast at Mel’s Original Diner.

“Leslie called me and said, ‘Somebody broke into the car, they took my backpack. There’s Tim’s ashes in there, ”Horne told FOX40.

Horne said two backpacks had been removed from the couple’s rental car. One was gray with car keys in Texas and important medicines in it. The other was a black nylon bag with a white gold wedding ring, $ 500 in cash, and a Ziploc bag containing her brother’s ashes.

“The thief must have broken into two other vehicles within a short time,” said Horne.

“One had, he was a hunter, who came from Idaho and they stole all of his guns and he was parked right in front,” said Fernando Rincon, the general manager of Mel’s Original Diner.

Rincon said car thieves have reached their parking lot many times, sometimes in broad daylight and within minutes.

“They’re usually more common during the holiday season when people shop and aren’t careful,” said Rincon. “I’ve been here for nine years, they tend to come from outside and look around for places and shopping malls to target vehicles.”

Horne said after sharing her ordeal on social media the sympathy was overwhelming. She said she hoped the thieves who kidnapped her beloved brother felt the same way too.

“The thought of it being in a ditch somewhere or along the highway really breaks my heart,” she said. “Just bring him back, take him away, you know.”

Anyone living near the Vacaville-Fairfield area who discovers something resembling a plastic bag containing ashes or other suspicious car break-ins should call the Vacaville Police Department.



Source link

]]>
https://htlhb.com/the-family-visiting-vacaville-has-a-car-broken-into-and-their-brothers-ashes-stolen/feed/ 0
Shopping centers in red zones are allowed until 5:00 p.m. under emergency PPKM. be opened https://htlhb.com/shopping-centers-in-red-zones-are-allowed-until-500-p-m-under-emergency-ppkm-be-opened/ https://htlhb.com/shopping-centers-in-red-zones-are-allowed-until-500-p-m-under-emergency-ppkm-be-opened/#respond Wed, 30 Jun 2021 03:31:14 +0000 https://htlhb.com/shopping-centers-in-red-zones-are-allowed-until-500-p-m-under-emergency-ppkm-be-opened/ TEMPO.CO, Jakarta – The government’s plan to enforce a stricter public activity restriction policy called PPKM Darurat or Emergency PPKM will affect opening hours of Shopping centers. According to the new directive, shopping centers are only allowed to open until 5 p.m. However, shopping centers in areas with tightened micro-PPKM can be operated until 8 […]]]>


TEMPO.CO, JakartaThe government’s plan to enforce a stricter public activity restriction policy called PPKM Darurat or Emergency PPKM will affect opening hours of Shopping centers. According to the new directive, shopping centers are only allowed to open until 5 p.m.

However, shopping centers in areas with tightened micro-PPKM can be operated until 8 p.m. The latest measure will reportedly divide areas into four zones, starting with the intermediate to the emergency level.

tempo Information received from a source that shopping malls’ restricted hours of operation apply to areas classified as red and orange zones or where a high risk virus is transmitted. The number of visitors is also limited to just 25 percent of the total capacity with strict health protocols.

This Covid-19 restriction also applies to places of worship in the red and orange zones. It also bans mass religious activities in areas with severe virus transmission.

Meanwhile, in areas outside the red and orange zones, religious activities are regulated by the Ministry of Religious Affairs with the implementation of strict health protocols.

The government reportedly planned to impose the emergency PPKM July 2nd to July 20th as the Covid-19 trend worsened in the archipelago. The policy evaluation is carried out every two weeks. If the number of daily cases is below 20,000 per day, the government will lower the PPKM micro status.

Also read: Emergency PPKM plan; Business people ask for government incentives

M ROSSENO AJI



Source link

]]>
https://htlhb.com/shopping-centers-in-red-zones-are-allowed-until-500-p-m-under-emergency-ppkm-be-opened/feed/ 0